Pied-à-terre By Baldessari E Baldessari

Pied-à-terre is an sophisticated apartment situated in Venice, Italy.

It was made by Baldessari e Baldessari.


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Pied-à-terre by Baldessari e Baldessari:

“The apartment of roughly 110 sqm (1,184 sqft) which the Baldessari siblings have radically renovated overlooks the San Vio canal in the Dorsoduro location, not far from some of Venice’s most well-known museums (Guggenheim, The Academia Galleries…). The apartment’s excellent place and the designers’ knowledge in the field of the arts led the project towards an notion of intersections among and allusions to art and design, the city and private spaces.

The function was hence made less difficult by the complete renovation of the spaces that permitted Michela and Paolo Baldessari to give volume and identity to the rooms, starting from scratch. The apartment was in fact formed by the unification of 2 units of an apartment developing dating back to the second half of the 1800′s: a dwelling located on the second floor (80 m2 [861 ft2]) and the attic (30 m2 [323 ft2]).

Beginning therefore from a sort of blank slate, the 2 architects produced a quite open living area on the second floor, to allow a continuous view of the city by means of its numerous windows.

Venice thus actions inside the residence, which in turn responds with its components of furnishing selected due to the fact their ironic Baroque markings resemble the art of Venetian lace and the decorative façades of the city’s most elegant buildings: the Crochet carpets (Paola Lenti) and the cement Heatwave heaters…

To lessen the number of walls and obstacles that would have obstructed the view of the city, the kitchen has also been dematerialized, transforming it into a low room with built-in Corian bench leading and table. It is not topped by the usual extractor fan, but rather by a slight lowering of the ceiling that in fact hides the air-conditioning and suction technique. The furniture/cupboards have also been reduced in volume and are built into the 3-dimensional paneling that runs along the walls of the space, as a result framing the “images” of Venice.

The colour white, which dominates the walls and custom-created furniture, was the backdrop selected to highlight the furnishing components and ar2rks chosen by the designers themselves. While the lighting has in truth been entrusted to lamps (Davide Groppi, Viabizzuno) that practically disappear into the architecture, the sofas, chairs and beds on the other hand, have a sturdy visual presence.
In the decision of the many paintings and sculptures, Venice subtly reappears as an allusion or ironic counterpoint: with the lion in the photographic background of Jarvis Wilcox’s collage or in the micro cars that will in no way be capable to circulate in the city but only in the perform of Thomas Bayrle.

The visual connection among the decrease floor and the attic has been entrusted to the flooring, built utilizing oak floorboards laid lengthways, that also cover the actions of the internal staircases.

The attic was created to be a guest region and involves a little living room and a bedroom with its own bathroom. Although nevertheless the roominess of the second floor permitted different rooms to be developed simply, on the floor upstairs Michela and Paolo Baldessari had to apply the guidelines of designing for small spaces, making use of architectural retraction and custom designing specific regions.

In this case also the city and its mood had been a precious source of inspiration. For instance, in the most private of spaces — the guestroom — the architects created a multifunctional piece of furniture in which the Tv shelf hides the concealed basin, which is comparable to these in old railway sleeping cars. It’s virtually like finding oneself on the Orient Express, on a journey from Paris to Istanbul, crossing the artistic and architectural landscape of a really contemporary Venice.”

Pictures by: Matteo Piazza

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